Blue Eco Blog

Splash! You are in Costa Rica's Blue Eco Blog. Echoing Eco for Oceans and Waters. Giving voice to dolphins and whales, their waves and their waters, and all denizens of the deep. News they think you should use. Dive in.

Meeting, Greeting and Stoking a Dolphin Megapod, Offshore Osa, Costa Rica Avivando Delfines

clock February 21, 2014 17:28 by author BlueEcoBlog

 Avivando delfines. Dolphin Stoking. How to meet, greet and stoke a dolphin megapod. People and Dolphins come together in the big blue offshore Osa peninsula, Costa RIca. Offshore Osa is the only place where this kind of thing is known and these dolphins need protection from nets and lines and hooks. Right?


Bienvenido delfines. Echar leña al fuego de amistad delfín. Como conocer, saludar y avivar un Megamanada delfín. La gente y delfiens se dan cita en el gran azul península de Osa, Costa Rica. Marino en Osa es el único lugar donde se sabe que este tipo de cosas y estos delfines necesitan protección de las redes y sedales y anzuelos. ¿Cierto?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BvTgGfKnyY&feature=c4-overview&list=UUZBaRfBkz4SPsBdQaa8v-4Q

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Dolphin Megapod Orgy, Solo Osa Costa Rica, Orgía Megamanada

clock February 20, 2014 21:35 by author BlueEcoBlog

Why is it called a dolphin orgy? See in this video from offshore Osa peninsula, Costa RIca. These dolphins need an area free of nets and lines to continue to mix their genes and grow culture. Osa may be the biggest dolphin orgy spot in the world. Let the dolphin festival swim on, no canned tuna, no shrimp, protect dolphin waters from the nets and lines that crash their party every day. Only Offshore Osa

Por qué se llama una orgía delfín? Vea en este vídeo de la península de de Osa, Costa Rica. Estos delfines tienen un área libre de las redes y las líneas a seguir para mezclar sus genes y hacer crecer la cultura. Osa puede ser el más grande punto orgíade delfines en el mundo. Que viva el festival de delfines, nada atún en lata, sin camarones, proteger las aguas de delfines de las redes y líneas que se estrellan su fiesta cada día. Sólo Marino en Osa, Costa Rica

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxTZ3dea-bo

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Dolphin Embassy in Costa Rica-How to Visit. Dolphin People #2

clock July 14, 2013 20:46 by author BlueEcoBlog

Dolphin Embassy of Osa Costa Rica. The biggest dolphin embassy in the world?
Cruising Underwater with Dolphins in the Big Blue 
Open Ocean Offshore where others throw giant nets
Swim with Dolphins instead of netting dolphins.
Be safe everyone.
Dolphin Ambassadors-Star Larkin, Vanessa Larkin and Shawn Larkin

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqYdciN1qUA

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Dolphin People Episode 1 Osa Costa Rica now on You Tube

clock June 22, 2013 11:39 by author BlueEcoBlog

Dolphin People Show from Costa Cetacea now on You Tube.  Click it to check it. 

 All ocean images from 2013 on GoPro Hero2s, in the blue water pelagic ecosystem of offshore Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica, Pacific Ocean.

Dive on Dolphin People

No more nets or lines for a Osa Pelagic Park!  EIS before Ocean Drilling!!!  Duh

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVxIqBwewpo&feature=c4-overview&list=UUZBaRfBkz4SPsBdQaa8v-4

 

 

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True Costa Rican Wild Animal Stories by Shawn Larkin Strunz

clock October 10, 2012 15:43 by author BlueEcoBlog

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Are tourists keeping Costa Rican dolphins awake?

clock August 30, 2012 09:28 by author BlueEcoBlog

Are tourists keeping Costa Rican dolphins awake?

Dolphins need protected areas and times.

Recent research on Hawaiian spinner dolphins indicates that they need protected times and places. Surprise! One bay is visited by as many as sixty swimmers at a time who try to play with a small group of dolphins. Seems the dolphins rest in the early daylight hours, and that’s when many swimmer tourists head out. Less dolphins may come into the bay and the dolphins might leave earlier than usual when too many people show up. Spinners in Hawaii rest in small groups near shore in shallow sandy bays near deep water. Scientists say these places need protection. Clearly tourists should be told to leave the dolphins alone in the early daylight hours and fishing and extraction should be stopped in the bays. Costa Rican dolphins should have it so good.


Costa Rican spinner dolphins deal with giant nets towed by ships, helicopters dropping bombs, long lines full of hooks, shrimp trawlers bulldozing the bottom, surprise drill ships making a big mess, big banging seismic surveys, cargo ships blitzing by, sport fishers plowing through the pod with lines and hooks, tourist boats gawking, and even some divers in the water. How do you think that effects their beauty sleep?


Don't forget here in Costa Rica spinner dolphins have no protected place at all.


Costa Rican spinner and spotted dolphins, who also rest in the early daylight, need tourists to leave them alone at this time. Sport fishing boats need to stop fishing in the dolphins as they particularly like the early hours of the day. Many hotel managers want tours to leave early to get everyone out of the hotel, but this is the wrong strategy if you are concerned about dolphins. Tourist operators like divers and fishers should put up on their web pages that they leave the dolphins alone in the am. Guests of Costa Cetacea over the years will recall that all tours leave late and respect the dolphins rest time, much to the frustration of some hotel managers. The interactions here in Costa Rica are much more interesting in the PM anyway.


Aloha to the Hawaiians for once again being the world ocean leaders. Lets hope Costa Rica follows.

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Communication with Dolphins

clock June 23, 2012 13:54 by author BlueEcoBlog

 Communication with Dolphins on video. Listen to the spinner dolphin super-pod sing human notes. Shawn Larkin is into his second decade of interacting with this resident spinner dolphin superpod and as you can see they will swim right over to people who have been respectful and creative consistently. This offshore open ocean dolphin pod has been attacked and netted for many decades. This video shows that a different relationship is possible with the dolphin super-pods, one that may prove to be much more valuable than killing them as bycatch for easy tuna fishing.

Stop putting lines in the water before you argue against people in the water, duh! otherwise you have no moral high ground. Just obvious greed.

Learning how to interact with the super pods of dolphins is the best chance on earth to understand alien society and intelligence, and how we can interface. We need to learn how to meet and greet all over the worlds oceans. This is crucial practice for the human race. What if we are the helpless species trying to beg a more powerful one to stop killing us as bycatch or for consumption?

Music is a part of the the start to the crucial dialog. And gear and boats and computers and technology and people.

Stop the netting and start swimming.

Make money from creation not destruction.

Help the human race advance.

Play with dolphins.

They will teach you.

Thank you to Denise Herzing for many years of ideas.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIKWtND2xgI


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Dolphins Dancing For Laura Chinchilla Again!

clock June 16, 2012 13:21 by author BlueEcoBlog

Dolphins Dancing For Laura Chinchilla Again!

Costa Rica To Conserve Ten Percent of Oceans.

Latin America's greatest ocean hero, Laura Chinchilla, granted future Costa Ricans a much better chance of sustainably utilizing our Oceans into the future.  The sad free for all of too powerful special interests will now be controlled with vision directed to the people and the future by a new Vice Minister of Aguas and Mares.  Wow!  No thats how you do it!  Seems now the voices of all groups of ocean users, not just the most connected screaming special interests, will have a say.  Now is time for Costa Ricans to speak up about what they know about our oceans, and help conserve it.  Have you heard about the largest dolphin pod in the world, the spinner dolphins of the Osa peninsula and Cano Island?  Aaaa, happens to be they need a park!  They live near to famous protected areas Corcovado National Park and Cano Island Biological Reserve, BUT, they live in waters attacked by nets and lines.  This Park or protected area, needs to be south and west of Cano Island to at least a distance of 30 nautical miles to help these spinners.  NOT just 8 miles from the island as some are saying!  8 miles is not enough to protect the biggest dolphin pod in the world and Golfito and Puerto Jimenez need to make a lot money in the long run from conserving these dolphins, not killing them for short term collapsing profits. 

Three blue cheers for the awesome president of Costa Rica.

Check it
http://www.costacetacea.com/bluewaterpelagicpark.html

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New Dolphin Dreamtime Dub Music from Bigger Blue

clock June 11, 2012 18:41 by author BlueEcoBlog

Do you dolphin dreamtime? Do it.
Do wild dolphins play with people?
You tell me.
Double Dolphin Dreamtime Dub by shawn larkin and Bigger Blue
recorded at La Milpa Grande, El Guaco,
Dolphins need pelagic parks around the world.
you should help them.
Osa blue water pelagic, Costa Rica.

http://youtu.be/9Rg9nvA3_30

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Saving Sharks 101 Complete Text

clock November 20, 2011 09:48 by author BlueEcoBlog
Saving Sharks 101
 
First published in The Tico Times

Sharks’ primal attraction stems from the fear evoked from an animal so powerful it could eat you, as well as being tasty meat you want to eat. But once you know sharks, respect and awe trump fear and hunger, most of the time.

By Shawn Larkin

Many cultures with a maritime heritage seem surprisingly sympathetic about sharks to landlubbers who normally only take the time to fear them or eat them.

Those who come to know the ocean soon love sharks. From ancient Polynesians and Panamanians to the modern dive tribe, sharks and people get along really well together. The dive tribe first focused modern conservation attention on sharks long ago, and we continue to be sharks greatest champions, as most recently evidenced by reports from Colombia’s Mal Pelo Biological Reserve by Russian divers (TT, Oct. 14).

Sharks’ primal attraction stems from the fear evoked from an animal so powerful it could eat you, as well as being tasty meat you want to eat. But once you know sharks, respect and awe trump fear and hunger, most of the time.

Over decades of taking people to swim with sharks, I have seen many self-proclaimed “sharkophobes,” who upon seeing the dreaded object of their fears in the big blue, jump right in – with their children. What causes such a sudden shift in attitudes?

Education came first in the form of a dive briefing on how to get in the water relatively safely with big sharks. Then came a demonstration. Then curiosity takes over. Finally, holdouts succumb to peer pressure – or is it peers uneaten?

The reward seems to be the power to tell stories that trump nearly all others at dinner that night, as in: “You caught a big fish? You saw a sloth? You rode a zip line? We swam with sharks.” Another reward is the wisdom that may come from contemplating one of the most enduring and diverse evolutionary masterpieces produced by our blue planet.

Sharks have been around much, much longer than humans. Their design has been so successful that they have branched into more than 300 production models ranging from the rare little horn shark at Cocos Island National Park to the largest fish in the sea – whale sharks – whose only known birthing waters appear to be near the Osa Peninsula of the south Pacific coast. 

Other famous Costa Rican sharks include: big schools of scalloped hammerheads; silky Galapagos; silver-tip sharks of Cocos; the bull sharks of Santa Rosa National Park, in the northwestern province of Guanacaste, and of the river mouths of both coasts; the Pacific white tips of most famed Pacific dive sites; and the nurse sharks of the Caribbean reefs. Cocos Island is often called Isle of the Sharks or Shark Island.

Ironically, although decades ago divers at Cocos greatly helped launch the global changing of perception of sharks from negative to positive, Costa Rica is now much more famous as an enemy of sharks, as we sell them for profit garnered from the exotic tastes of wealthy foreigners. Shark fins for soup can be worth more than double the price of the next most-valuable Tico seafood: fresh, cold tuna. Since the fins are desired dried like jerky, fishers need no costly refrigeration or ice, just space. But this space is at a premium, so all manner of getting rid of anything but fins is irresistible to the greedy and wasteful.

The way sharks are fished here is also greedy and wasteful. Long-lines with lots of hooks left to drift and kill indiscriminately is not sustainable, and neither is netting congregations of marine life with giant purse seine nets. Our neighboring countries are already banning these foolishly unsustainable methods. Costa Rica is appearing to be the slacker nation in Latin America when it comes to helping conserve valuable marine life. We should have been the world leader. We could change that.

The Polynesian Marshall Islands recently parleyed their culture’s reverence of sharks into sustained economic generation through marine conservation. This seafaring nation declared all of its waters a shark refuge and banned foolish fishing. The remote islands have focused on where the most steady and nationally distributed money is coming from: divers, sportfishing, artisan fishing, surfers and ecotourists. The money goes into conserving what makes the money, not exterminating the sharks with the golden fins. The Marshall Islands is now home to the biggest real shark sanctuary on planet Earth. You can be sure countless travel vacations and investments are being planned accordingly.

The Polynesians and the Panamanians, and many other ocean nations, see the writing on the water. The only way to conserve big marine animals is with big marine protected areas and corridors. No matter how much money is spent on counting, tagging, satellite transmitting, diving, boating, filming, fuel, foundations, studies, publications and summits, they will all come to the same conclusion: make managed protected areas and corridors or your big-money animals like sharks, which people love so much, will disappear.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sORG-WJIXBk

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The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in anyway.

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