Blue Eco Blog

Splash! You are in Costa Rica's Blue Eco Blog. Echoing Eco for Oceans and Waters. Giving voice to dolphins and whales, their waves and their waters, and all denizens of the deep. News they think you should use. Dive in.

Meeting, Greeting and Stoking a Dolphin Megapod, Offshore Osa, Costa Rica Avivando Delfines

clock February 21, 2014 17:28 by author BlueEcoBlog

 Avivando delfines. Dolphin Stoking. How to meet, greet and stoke a dolphin megapod. People and Dolphins come together in the big blue offshore Osa peninsula, Costa RIca. Offshore Osa is the only place where this kind of thing is known and these dolphins need protection from nets and lines and hooks. Right?


Bienvenido delfines. Echar leña al fuego de amistad delfín. Como conocer, saludar y avivar un Megamanada delfín. La gente y delfiens se dan cita en el gran azul península de Osa, Costa Rica. Marino en Osa es el único lugar donde se sabe que este tipo de cosas y estos delfines necesitan protección de las redes y sedales y anzuelos. ¿Cierto?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BvTgGfKnyY&feature=c4-overview&list=UUZBaRfBkz4SPsBdQaa8v-4Q

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Dolphin Megapod Orgy, Solo Osa Costa Rica, Orgía Megamanada

clock February 20, 2014 21:35 by author BlueEcoBlog

Why is it called a dolphin orgy? See in this video from offshore Osa peninsula, Costa RIca. These dolphins need an area free of nets and lines to continue to mix their genes and grow culture. Osa may be the biggest dolphin orgy spot in the world. Let the dolphin festival swim on, no canned tuna, no shrimp, protect dolphin waters from the nets and lines that crash their party every day. Only Offshore Osa

Por qué se llama una orgía delfín? Vea en este vídeo de la península de de Osa, Costa Rica. Estos delfines tienen un área libre de las redes y las líneas a seguir para mezclar sus genes y hacer crecer la cultura. Osa puede ser el más grande punto orgíade delfines en el mundo. Que viva el festival de delfines, nada atún en lata, sin camarones, proteger las aguas de delfines de las redes y líneas que se estrellan su fiesta cada día. Sólo Marino en Osa, Costa Rica

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxTZ3dea-bo

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Dolphin Embassy in Costa Rica-How to Visit. Dolphin People #2

clock July 14, 2013 20:46 by author BlueEcoBlog

Dolphin Embassy of Osa Costa Rica. The biggest dolphin embassy in the world?
Cruising Underwater with Dolphins in the Big Blue 
Open Ocean Offshore where others throw giant nets
Swim with Dolphins instead of netting dolphins.
Be safe everyone.
Dolphin Ambassadors-Star Larkin, Vanessa Larkin and Shawn Larkin

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqYdciN1qUA

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Dolphin People Episode 1 Osa Costa Rica now on You Tube

clock June 22, 2013 11:39 by author BlueEcoBlog

Dolphin People Show from Costa Cetacea now on You Tube.  Click it to check it. 

 All ocean images from 2013 on GoPro Hero2s, in the blue water pelagic ecosystem of offshore Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica, Pacific Ocean.

Dive on Dolphin People

No more nets or lines for a Osa Pelagic Park!  EIS before Ocean Drilling!!!  Duh

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVxIqBwewpo&feature=c4-overview&list=UUZBaRfBkz4SPsBdQaa8v-4

 

 

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True Costa Rican Wild Animal Stories by Shawn Larkin Strunz

clock October 10, 2012 15:43 by author BlueEcoBlog

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Costa Rica Fish Farms are Back but Aqua Permaculture This TIme

clock August 17, 2012 08:41 by author BlueEcoBlog

Oceanic Farming Is Wave of the Future

From The Tico Times Thursday, September 16, 2008- By Shawn Larkin
THE BIG BLUE: The soil of the future is in the ocean

Costa Rica’s biggest and most bioproductive ecosystem, the offshore open-ocean pelagic, could be a shining blue diamond of economic productivity with a little management fertilizer.

Of course, pelagic or deep-sea fishing already provides big money, but many who have studied the situation think sustainability is being left out of the equation. Will Costa Rica’s oceans collapse like a tree stripped of leaves and fruit, or will it bloom for generations?

Ocean parks, refuges, sanctuaries and biological corridors clearly are part of any blue future. Costa Rica has demonstrated to the world the economic value of green protected areas, and hopefully we will follow our own lesson with our marine resources.

But parks are not all the future holds for our oceans. If history is any indicator, oceanic farming will become even bigger than the terrestrial kind. The soil of the future is the ocean.

If we know anything about the future, it’s that it will be hungry. By many estimates, more then half the world’s seafood is already farmed. And more than half the world’s fisheries have collapsed.

The future of open-ocean permaculture will be very different from the first crude attempts at ocean monoculture. As farmers around the world go green – meaning organic and sustainable – by demand, blue farmers get the advantage of being able to start off that way. Companies like Kona Blue Water Farms are already leading the way in sustainable seafood production. Blue farmers could literally save the world.

Future blue farms might be more like Indian milpas than monoculture banana plantations: multiple useful species growing in synergistic harmony, tended to by nearby local communities.

Imagine a giant shining blue diamond, bigger than your house, far offshore, out of sight of land – a giant diamond in the sea, half submerged. A pole runs from top to bottom. The sides of the diamond are made of a mesh that keeps fish in but lets water pass through. The waste from the fish feeds strings of shellfish around the bottom of the diamond. Algae and other life growing on the shellfish bring in a cloud of little fish that surround the diamond. Small holes in the mesh let the little fish dart through, feeding the big fish. And the big fish are harvested as needed.

Permaculture.

Local communities and businesses could tend their own, local blue diamonds. Other diamonds could be released offshore near the northern or southern border. With currents, nature and technology doing the work, the diamonds would get harvested at the other end of the country, full of fat fish. Sportfishers would increase their catches around the massive fish-attracting devices, divers and snorkelers would go below for a look, boats and kayakers would want to go around, guides would be needed, and even more money and livelihoods would be made.

Perhaps we could help lead the way to the future of blue farming, applying the age-old principles of permaculture and sustainability. Many cultures have sustainably harvested shallow coastal waters since ancient times. Now is the time to take it farther offshore and farm, as well as conserve, the big blue.

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Tuna Fishing Endangers Dolphins in Costa Rica

clock August 7, 2012 12:25 by author BlueEcoBlog

Dolphins are Costa Rica’s most famous divers – and they have a problem. For decades, in the eastern tropical Pacific, the commercial fishing industry has hunted dolphin species that form enormous congregations, such as pantropical spotted, spinner, bottlenose, common and Risso’s dolphins.

Tuna always school beneath large groups of dolphins, so corralling the dolphins with helicopters and speedboats causes the tuna to form a more easily netted mass below. Unlike most sport fishers who catch a few fish in a sustainable way, many commercial operations set vast nets around dolphins in hopes of grabbing all the tuna possible. This technique has killed millions of dolphins, and continues to kill them as recently as last month off the Southern Zone’s Osa Peninsula.

Dolphin and tuna are often about the same size, and eat the same size of prey. The vast groups of yellowfin tuna constantly following large dolphin groups are led to lunch. The tuna seem to instinctively follow the dolphins, as do birds and other fish, because dolphins will find the food. The big brains of these marine mammals figure to look for chow a few miles offshore of an island, when the tide is high, the moon is full, the wind is clam, the water temperature is just right and the coast is clear, and the needlefish are schooling. The tiny brain of the tuna might just think: follow the dolphin.

Dolphins, being so social and traveling in such large groups, actually create a sort of structure, like a reef, in which smaller fish can hide as well as collect scrapes. Many species of fish, besides tuna, cruise in groups with the dolphins, including silky sharks, blue marlin and sailfish.

We call this famous phenomenon the tuna-dolphin association of the eastern tropical Pacific, not because it’s just tuna and dolphins but because huge commercial fishing fleets use dolphins breathing at the surface to find the tuna swimming below them. Many different species die in the nets of commercial fishing fleets. You may have heard of “dolphin-safe tuna”; this catchy phrase is better described as “some dead dolphin and mixed-species tuna.” The aforementioned catching method, sometimes still used, is “major dead dolphin and mixed species tuna.” As far as I know, none of the forms of massive-scale tuna fishing is even remotely safe for dolphins – some ways just kill less than others do.So, how do the methods differ? One is called a “backdown.” After netting all the tuna and dolphins through the normal process, the ship motors slowly in reverse. This, with the help of a few speedboats, lowers a part of the net down below the surface. Hopefully, the freaked-out dolphins will then swim out. Sometimes they do. Sometimes boats chase them out. But if the tuna follow them, the net is quickly yanked up. All the while, daylight is fading, the crew and workers are on the clock, and fuel is being guzzled. This is “dolphin-safe” tuna. Other methods don’t even use a backdown.

Waiting to catch the tuna when they are away from dolphins requires more time, effort and money, but is the only way to ensure dolphins are safe from slaughter. Reportedly, some boats do not set on dolphins, but until tuna consumers make this distinction, the prices of unscrupulous competitors will hurt the real “dolphin-safe” businesses.

Dolphin tourism can sometimes be at odds with commercial fishing interests. It makes it a little harder to surround a group of dolphins with helicopters, speedboats and a factory ship when a happy group of photosnapping tourists is in the way. On rare occasions, frustrated pilots in rickety helicopters that look more like lawn mowers than aircraft will attempt to drive off the people by buzzing a tourist boat near dolphins. If you are rooting for the dolphins, you can stay with them until there is not enough daylight for the time-consuming process of chasing and netting.

Why don’t the dolphins just smack a few boat captains on the head as they jump over the nets and swim away giggling? Because, like humans, dolphins, once they start to panic, are not so smart. Ancient instincts, such as freaking out, take over. And, as with humans, being in large groups makes panic worse. Dolphins are used to vast spaces; a net causes panic, and they just don’t think to jump over.

I wonder how commercial fishers will fare once the big pods are gone. This may sound distressingly familiar if you know about the vast herds or flocks of animals, such as American bison and passenger pigeons, which have disappeared on land and in the air. As the buffalo once did, the dead dolphins rot in waste or fall to scavengers, and, as with the passenger pigeons, a point may arrive when the population crashes suddenly to extinction.

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Dolphins-Should we swim and sing with them or put hooks and nets in with them?

clock July 20, 2012 14:00 by author BlueEcoBlog

Dolphins from this pod still being killed in July 2012.
Should Costa Rica kill them for tuna?
The video in the link below is Shawn Larkin freediving and singing with the spinner dolphin superpod of Osa, Costa Rica. Some people net dolphins, some people put lines and hooks in the water with dolphins. Some people sing and swim with them. What do you think is the right answer?

Why does KETO Costa Rica and Mar Viva and PROMAR,do nothing to help these spinner dolphins? They will take your money though and praise themselves for dolphin conservation, but what about our largest dolphin pod?.


Why do so many Costa Ricans cry about Faeroe Island and Japan and Greenland Cetacean kills, yet do NOTHING YEAR AFTER YEAR, to help their own resident spinner dolphin superpod from being killed in net and lines?

Why have so called Costa Rican dolphin conservation organizations not said one word about our Osa spinner dolphin superpod, the biggest resident dolphin superpod IN THE WORLD!
why?

$$$$ and corruption
Thats why.

Sharks are getting a lot harder to fish in Costa Rica, as the thieves have hardly left any.
The money now is in tuna that swim with dolphins, and its a lot more profit if you Ticos keep looking the other way por favor.

At least the other countries try to defend their sick atrocities. We Costa Ricans try to hide ours by whining and directing attention to others.

Pelagic Parks For Everyone!

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbcqCrOMFas&feature=plcp

 

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