Blue Eco Blog

Splash! You are in Costa Rica's Blue Eco Blog. Echoing Eco for Oceans and Waters. Giving voice to dolphins and whales, their waves and their waters, and all denizens of the deep. News they think you should use. Dive in.

Dolphin People Episode 1 Osa Costa Rica now on You Tube

clock June 22, 2013 11:39 by author BlueEcoBlog

Dolphin People Show from Costa Cetacea now on You Tube.  Click it to check it. 

 All ocean images from 2013 on GoPro Hero2s, in the blue water pelagic ecosystem of offshore Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica, Pacific Ocean.

Dive on Dolphin People

No more nets or lines for a Osa Pelagic Park!  EIS before Ocean Drilling!!!  Duh

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVxIqBwewpo&feature=c4-overview&list=UUZBaRfBkz4SPsBdQaa8v-4

 

 

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Pelagic Park’ Would Help Save Spinner Dolphins

clock August 15, 2012 04:20 by author BlueEcoBlog

‘Pelagic Park’ Would Help Save Spinner Dolphins

From The Tico Times, Posted: Friday, September 05, 2008 - By Shawn Larkin

The most hightech, large-scale fishing in Costa Rica’s oceans is commercial tuna fishing.

From hardworking crew and helicopters to radar and satellites, these operations take catching fish very seriously.

They drop enormous nets bigger than a city block into the sea to catch vast quantities of an assortment of marine life. They are after mostly tuna, among the most valuable fish of any denizens of the deep.

When fishing boats find a big group of spinner dolphins, they find some of their ever-present sidekicks: giant yellowfin and bigeye tuna. Mostly seen only below the surface, the tuna would not be so easy to locate without the help of the dolphins, which must surface regularly to breathe. The giant tuna pack together around the dolphins that find their food for them. Here, offshore of southern Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula, the big tuna and the spinner dolphins are always together.

I reckon the dolphins think: “Now that the  moon is full, the current is from the southwest at two knots and the wind is calm, a bigspaced swell is coming in from west-southwest, it rained last night and the layers of water temperatures changed a lot, it’s a sunny day, almost high noon, and I think I know where all those other dolphins are going, and the orcas will not hunt today, and the tuna boats will be busy for a few hours – hope my friends and family make it out! – we should go hunt the south end of the Osa drop-off upwelling.”

And I reckon the tuna are thinking just one thing: “Follow the dolphins.”

Follow the dolphins. Just as the seabirds, the sailfish and the marlin, the sharks and the whales, the sportfishing captains and the commercial tuna-fishing fleets do. Follow the dolphins; they have the best actionable ocean intelligence. The dolphins have the network. They are always with the food.

In the Osa drop-off upwelling, where dense, cooler and nutrient-rich water is pushed toward the ocean surface, the tuna, birds and other marine life are nearly always with the dolphins. All a commercial fishing fleet has to do is find the birds on a special radar, send up a helicopter or two to check it out and call in coordinates, start corralling the dolphins with the helicopter and explosives dropped from the helicopter, put down small, fast chase boats to further corral the dolphins, use the ship to corral the dolphins even more, and then put down a very big net around the dolphins and associated marine life with the help of a special net boat.

If you do this, you get a lot of tuna in the net below the dolphins, and it’s worth a lot of money.

Sadly, this kind of bonanza is unsustainable. The longer-lived, more slowly reproducing spinners will probably die out before the tuna are exhausted, perhaps giving the tuna a chance to recuperate, because once the dolphins are gone, no one will be able to find the tuna. But how will the tuna find food without the dolphins?

Fishing industry insiders have told me that dozens of spinner dolphins are killed every day by busy boats. They die most frequently when their narrow, smiling mouths get stuck in the holes of the nets. Hundreds more must be manhandled by diving crews and thrown out of the nets daily, lest the nets are damaged.

Other Osa dolphin species, such as bottlenose and spotted dolphins, are somewhat likelier to swim out if a small piece of one end of the net is put down for a while, a procedure known as a “backdown.”

Backdowns do not help Osa’s spinner dolphins, however; they stay in the net.

Tuna fishermen say the spinners are tontos, stupid, because they do not swim away from the ship and out of the net. They seem unable to stop surfing the ship’s waves. The same trait the tourist boats love dooms the poor spinners.

Time for ‘Pelagic Park’

The blue-water pelagic (open-ocean) ecosystem domain of the Osa’s spinner dolphins is probably the most productive ecosystem in Costa Rica, perhaps in the tropical marine world. According to former members of Jacques Cousteau’s legendary conservation ship, Calypso, and the BBC’s top “Blue Planet” underwater cameramen, offshore Osa is the richest tropical blue water they have seen anywhere on the planet (see sidebar).

The dolphins’ domain is an area between five and 20 nautical miles from Caño Island Biological Reserve. The reserve’s waters currently extend only about two nautical miles; this is not enough to protect large animals such as dolphins and tuna. To protect large marine animals, you need a Corcovado or Amistad-sized park at sea.

For many years, around the world, protected marine areas have proven to increase catches in surrounding areas. With a big enough pelagic park, or better still, parks and corridors, tuna-fishing boats could make money in the long term, not just short.

An astounding number of big, amazing  animals live in the Osa drop-off upwelling area and would be protected along with the spinners. Fin, sei, Bryde’s, humpback and blue whales and orcas frequent this little upwelling. Sailfish, marlin, tuna, manta rays, whale sharks, turtles, beaked whales, pilot whales, pseudorcas, bottlenose dolphins and spotted dolphins are found here in some of the highest concentrations in the world.

A special area of the Osa drop-off upwelling, the clearest waters in Costa Rica, would be an excellent place to prohibit commercial fishing, save the spinners and allow boaters and divers to see and snorkel with dolphins and other amazing marine life in the big blue.

Many people in Costa Rica, including yours truly, already benefit greatly from tourists visiting the giant dolphin pods and other marine life congregations off the Osa. But the commercial fishing fleet will end it soon for us all if some sort of pelagic park is not created.

The spinners are dying. There seem to be a lot fewer little spinners now then there were in the past. The pods no longer stretch to the horizon in every direction.

A park is the only solution. Just as Costa Rica has demonstrated to the world the value of protecting functioning terrestrial ecosystems, we can show the world the same goes for the ocean. Costa Rica needs to make peace with the ocean as well as the rain forest. It’s time to set aside a meaningful, not miniscule, part of Costa Rica’s biggest ecosystem: the open ocean.

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Dolphins-Should we swim and sing with them or put hooks and nets in with them?

clock July 20, 2012 14:00 by author BlueEcoBlog

Dolphins from this pod still being killed in July 2012.
Should Costa Rica kill them for tuna?
The video in the link below is Shawn Larkin freediving and singing with the spinner dolphin superpod of Osa, Costa Rica. Some people net dolphins, some people put lines and hooks in the water with dolphins. Some people sing and swim with them. What do you think is the right answer?

Why does KETO Costa Rica and Mar Viva and PROMAR,do nothing to help these spinner dolphins? They will take your money though and praise themselves for dolphin conservation, but what about our largest dolphin pod?.


Why do so many Costa Ricans cry about Faeroe Island and Japan and Greenland Cetacean kills, yet do NOTHING YEAR AFTER YEAR, to help their own resident spinner dolphin superpod from being killed in net and lines?

Why have so called Costa Rican dolphin conservation organizations not said one word about our Osa spinner dolphin superpod, the biggest resident dolphin superpod IN THE WORLD!
why?

$$$$ and corruption
Thats why.

Sharks are getting a lot harder to fish in Costa Rica, as the thieves have hardly left any.
The money now is in tuna that swim with dolphins, and its a lot more profit if you Ticos keep looking the other way por favor.

At least the other countries try to defend their sick atrocities. We Costa Ricans try to hide ours by whining and directing attention to others.

Pelagic Parks For Everyone!

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbcqCrOMFas&feature=plcp

 

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Catch and Release Sportfishing is headed the way of African Big Game Tourist Hunting—More money and sustainability in oceanic adventure ecotourism

clock June 3, 2012 10:15 by author BlueEcoBlog
Are Catch and Release Sport Fishers hiding who really catches their fish? 


Long ago shooting big animals to say you did it, stuff it for your wall, or get a trophy photo of yourself looming over the motionless beast, seemed like a cool thing to do for many tourists. When the animals started disappearing, big game hunting began to appear to be more of a ego trip. Trophy catch and release sportfishing for fish might be headed on the same course, for the same reasons.


While sportfishing to eat fish will be around as long as there are fish, trophy fishing for endangered large animals to release might not last too much longer. As happened before with the fashion of big game hunting in Africa for Europeans, as more people find out what trophy fishing really entails, the mystique is being shattered. A heap of porters and a bunch of beasts of burden doing most of the work, once their roll was understood, took much of the glory out of big game hunting because the glory was theirs. And wealthy tourists didn’t really need or want to eat lions, tigers and rhinos.


The catch and release crowd of sport fishing is pretty darn similar. The glory belongs to the mates and captain who, almost always do the vast majority of the work. A thousand or so horsepower seems to help a lot as well. Watching, it can be difficult to figure out what some of the “sportfishers” do other than sit, sip, and reel the reel sometimes, often letting the mates do much of the reeling. The mates will then grab the fish, take the hook out, and put the “sport fisher” in position with the fish for a photo. Then a mate will often be the one to take the photo of somebody holding the fish he just caught.


So the sportfisher comes back and tells everyone he caught a great beast, but since the great beasts are disappearing, he was grand enough to let it go. Wow. Dude.


I do know people who really do battle these fish themselves, from fueling up the boats, to baiting the hooks, to hours sweating as they finesse a powerful giant to the boat without breaking the line, to gaffing it, hauling it in, killing it and then taking it home to their family or community. They kill the fish because this type of fisher usually does not go after endangered species that need to be released. They fish for food, and with their expert skill they target other species.


That is what the sport fishing industry should do. Forget about billfish, they are in danger. Catching billfish stresses the creature big time and only contributes to their problems. Or did you think this macho battle was easy on the fish?


Do you really need to catch billfish to release them? For what? To study them to find out why they are disappearing? There are a lot of other fish in the sea. You will be just as tough and cool catching those. Even better if you bring home some catch to feed the hungry.


The future of terrestrial big game conservation and economic generation was ecotourism, not tourists hunting lions and elephants and gazelle. The future of ocean big game moneymaking and protection will be adventure ecotourism, not catching and releasing endangered sailfish, marlin and sharks.


http://www.costacetacea.com/costaricanoceanslife/billfishrescuedive.html


Shawn Larkin All rights reserved. Copyright 2012. Alright.

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Spinner Dolphin Experience. Swimming and seabobbing with thousands of dolphins in Costa Rica

clock May 13, 2012 15:12 by author BlueEcoBlog

Spinner dolphin experience with Costa Cetacea in the offshore open ocean of Osa Costa Rican blue water pelagic.  The best spinner dolphin footage yet known.  The best footage of people on seabobs with dolphins.  The spinner dolphins are sea masters and we are their sea servents.  Pelagic Park Please for Osa divers and yachts and local fishers!  Also check out the billfish swimming with dolphins.  Click right here to see it.  Once again Costa Cetacea are the ocean leaders, we will follow.

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World Record Dolphin Superpod Photo from Costa Rica?

clock September 8, 2011 02:03 by author BlueEcoBlog

 We think this may be the most dolphins to appear in a single photo. Do you know of one that beats it?

Please let us know. This spinner dolphin superpod is nine nautical miles south west from Cano Island Biological Reserve offshore of the Osa pensinsula. How many do you count?

Click on a dolphin for more.

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Dolphins from Costa Rica speak again

clock August 19, 2011 14:45 by author BlueEcoBlog
Another dolphin statement translated.

After a period of silence mourning the contamination of their ancestral waters, some Osa dolphins swam right up to us and said, we think,

“That really sucks that these big ships can just show up by surprise and make a big mess and big noise in our feeding, mating, birthing and superpod waters. We thought Costa Rica was better than that. Plus none of the so called conservations organizations and foundations did squat. But they are telling you they watch out for us dolphins. HA. The tuna boats are still slaughtering us too. Lighten up people.  Will anyone really help dolphins here in Costa Rica. We only have fins you know.”

An alternative translation is,

“Do you really like the taste of canned tuna?”

We are awaiting more word from the dolphins of Osa Costa Rica.

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